RegexPal: Web-Based Regex Testing Reinvented

Yes I know, there are many other JavaScript regex testers available. Why did I create yet another? RegexPal brings several new things to the table for such web-based apps, and in my (biased) opinion it's easier to use and more helpful towards learning regular expressions than the others currently available. Additionally, most other such tools are very slow for the kind of data I often work with. They might appear fast when displaying 10 matches, but what about 100, 1000, or 5000? Try generating 5,000 matches (which is easy to do with an any-character pattern such as a dot) in your favorite existing web-based tool and see if your browser ever recovers (doubtful). The same task takes RegexPal less than half a second, and what's more, results overlay the text while you're typing it.

At the moment, RegexPal is short on features, but here are the highlights:

  • Real-time regex syntax highlighting with backwards and forwards context awareness.
  • Lightning-fast match highlighting with alternating styles.
  • Inverted matches (match any text not matched by the regex).
regexpal.com screenshot

I'm not sure when I'll add additional features, but there are lots of things I'm considering. If there is something you'd like to see, let me know.

A few things to be aware of:

  • The approach I've used for scrollable rich-text editing (which I haven't seen elsewhere) is fast but a bit buggy. Firefox 2 and IE7 have the least issues, but it more or less works in other browsers as well.
  • The syntax highlighting generally marks corner-case issues that create cross-browser inconsistencies as errors even if they are the result of browser bugs or missing behavior documentation in ECMA-262 v3.
  • There are different forms of line breaks cross-platform/browser. E.g., Firefox uses \n even on Windows where nearly all programs use \r\n. This can affect the results of certain regexes.

At least for me, RegexPal is lots of fun to play with and helps to make learning regular expressions easy through its instant feedback. I encourage you to just go play with it and discover its results on your own, but for the curious, I'll keep rambling…

Regex syntax parsing (needed for the syntax highlighting) is somewhat complex, due to the numerous backwards and forwards context awareness issues involved. Take, for example, the pattern \10. What does it mean?

  • Backreference 10, if not inside a character class and at least 10 capturing groups are opened before that point.
  • Backreference 1, followed by a literal "0", if not inside a character class and between 1 and 9 capturing groups are opened before that point.
  • Octal character index 10 (decimal 8), if inside a character class, or if no capturing groups are opened before that point.
  • The three literal characters "\", "1", and "0", if preceded by an unescaped "\" character.
  • An incomplete token in a couple other situations.

Another example is the "-" character. Outside a character class it's always a literal hyphen, but inside a character class…

  • It creates a range between tokens if:
    • There is a preceding and following token in the class, or it's preceded by a token and is the last character in an unclosed character class (caveats follow).
  • It's a literal character if:
    • It's the first or last character in the class.
    • It's preceded by an unescaped "\".
    • It follows a token which is the end index for a range.
    • It follows a hyphen which creates a range.
  • It's an error if:
    • It's creating a range between tokens in reverse character index order (e.g., z-a, @-!, \uFFFF-\b, or \127-\cB).
    • It would otherwise create a range, but it's followed or preceded by a token which represents more than one character index (e.g., \d). In fact, in some cases browsers take this to mean that the hyphen should be treated as a literal, but browser bugs cause it to be handled inconsistently so RegexPal flags it as a range error.

Here are a few more things which aren't errors but are flagged as such:

  • Empty, top-level alternation, except at the end of the pattern, where such an alternation is ignored when highlighting matches in order to create a less surprising experience while the user is in the middle of constructing the regex. Empty, top-level alternation is flagged as an error because it effectively truncates the regex at that point (since it will always match). If a zero-length, top-level alteration is really needed, there are other easy ways to do that more explicitly.
  • Lookaround quantifiers (e.g., the plus sign in (?!x)+). This would be an actual error with some regex libraries (e.g., PCRE), and although that's not the case in most web browsers, such constructs add no value. As a result, RegexPal flags such quantifiers as an error, since they are almost certainly a user mistake.
  • \c when not followed by A–Z, \x when not followed by two hex characters, and \u when not followed by four hex characters. Although these do not cause most browsers to throw errors, they are handled inconsistently cross-browser and are hence flagged as errors. They would almost certainly be a user mistake even if the cross-browser issues didn't exist.

Credit to osteele.com from where the text of the short-and-sweet Quick Reference is based, and to RegexBuddy from JGsoft for inspiring many of RegexPal's features. The name RegexPal is, in part, a nod to RegexBuddy, but also selected because it contains both "regex" and "regexp." wink

Safari Support with XRegExp 0.2.2

When I released XRegExp 0.2 several days ago, I hadn't yet tested in Safari or Swift. When I remembered to do this shortly afterwards, I found that both of those WebKit-based browsers didn't like it and often crashed when trying to use it! This was obviously a Very Bad Thing, but due to major time availability issues I wasn't able to get around to in-depth bug-shooting and testing until tonight.

It turns out that Safari's regex engine contains a bug which causes an error to be thrown when compiling a regex containing a character class ending with "[\\".

// These throw an error:
[ /[[\\]/ , /[^[\\]/ , /[abc[\\]/ ]

// ...While these are all fine:
[ /[\\[]/ , /[\[\\]/ , /[[]/ , /[\\]/ , /[[\\abc]/ , /[[\/]/ , /[[(\\]/ ]

// Testing:
try {
	RegExp("[[\\]");
	alert("OK!");
} catch (err) {
	alert(err);
	/* Safari shows:
	"SyntaxError: Invalid regular expression: missing terminating ] for
	character class" */
}

As a result, I've changed two instances of [^[\\] to [^\\[] and upped the version number to 0.2.2. XRegExp has now been tested and works without any known issues in all of the following browsers:

  • Internet Explorer 5.5 – 7
  • Firefox 2.0.0.4
  • Opera 9.21
  • Safari 3.0.2 beta for Windows
  • Swift 0.2

You can get the newest version here.

XRegExp 0.2: Now With Named Capture

Update: This version of XRegExp is outdated. See XRegExp.com for the latest, greatest version.

JavaScript's regular expression flavor doesn't support named capture. Well, says who? XRegExp 0.2 brings named capture support, along with several other new features. But first of all, if you haven't seen the previous version, make sure to check out my post on XRegExp 0.1, because not all of the documentation is repeated below.

Highlights

  • Comprehensive named capture support (New)
  • Supports regex literals through the addFlags method (New)
  • Free-spacing and comments mode (x)
  • Dot matches all mode (s)
  • Several other minor improvements over v0.1

Named capture

There are several different syntaxes in the wild for named capture. I've compiled the following table based on my understanding of the regex support of the libraries in question. XRegExp's syntax is included at the top.

Library Capture Backreference In replacement Stored at
XRegExp (<name>…) \k<name> ${name} result.name
.NET (?<name>…)
(?'name'…)
\k<name>
\k'name'
${name} Matcher.Groups('name')
Perl 5.10 (beta) (?<name>…)
(?'name'…)
\k<name>
\k'name'
\g{name}
$+{name} $+{name}
Python (?P<name>…) (?P=name) \g<name> result.group('name')
PHP preg (PCRE 7) (.NET, Perl, and Python styles) $regs['name'] $result['name']

No other major regex library currently supports named capture, although the JGsoft engine (used by products like RegexBuddy) supports both .NET and Python syntax. XRegExp does not use a question mark at the beginning of a named capturing group because that would prevent it from being used in regex literals (JavaScript would immediately throw an "invalid quantifier" error).

XRegExp supports named capture on an on-request basis. You can add named capture support to any regex though the use of the new "k" flag. This is done for compatibility reasons and to ensure that regex compilation time remains as fast as possible in all situations.

Following are several examples of using named capture:

// Add named capture support using the XRegExp constructor
var repeatedWords = new XRegExp("\\b (<word> \\w+ ) \\s+ \\k<word> \\b", "gixk");

// Add named capture support using RegExp, after overriding the native constructor
XRegExp.overrideNative();
var repeatedWords = new RegExp("\\b (<word> \\w+ ) \\s+ \\k<word> \\b", "gixk");

// Add named capture support to a regex literal
var repeatedWords = /\b (<word> \w+ ) \s+ \k<word> \b/.addFlags("gixk");

var data = "The the test data.";

// Check if data contains repeated words
var hasDuplicates = repeatedWords.test(data);
// hasDuplicates: true

// Use the regex to remove repeated words
var output = data.replace(repeatedWords, "${word}");
// output: "The test data."

In the above code, I've also used the x flag provided by XRegExp, to improve readability. Note that the addFlags method can be called multiple times on the same regex (e.g., /pattern/g.addFlags("k").addFlags("s")), but I'd recommend adding all flags in one shot, for efficiency.

Here are a few more examples of using named capture, with an overly simplistic URL-matching regex (for comprehensive URL parsing, see parseUri):

var url = "http://microsoft.com/path/to/file?q=1";
var urlParser = new XRegExp("^(<protocol>[^:/?]+)://(<host>[^/?]*)(<path>[^?]*)\\?(<query>.*)", "k");
var parts = urlParser.exec(url);
/* The result:
parts.protocol: "http"
parts.host: "microsoft.com"
parts.path: "/path/to/file"
parts.query: "q=1" */

// Named backreferences are also available in replace() callback functions as properties of the first argument
var newUrl = url.replace(urlParser, function(match){
	return match.replace(match.host, "yahoo.com");
});
// newUrl: "http://yahoo.com/path/to/file?q=1"

Note that XRegExp's named capture functionality does not support deprecated JavaScript features including the lastMatch property of the global RegExp object and the RegExp.prototype.compile() method.

Singleline (s) and extended (x) modes

The other non-native flags XRegExp supports are s (singleline) for "dot matches all" mode, and x (extended) for "free-spacing and comments" mode. For full details about these modifiers, see the FAQ in my XRegExp 0.1 post. However, one difference from the previous version is that XRegExp 0.2, when using the x flag, now allows whitespace between a regex token and its quantifier (quantifiers are, e.g., +, *?, or {1,3}). Although the previous version's handling/limitation in this regard was documented, it was atypical compared to other regex libraries. This has been fixed.

Download

XRegExp 0.2.5.

XRegExp has been tested in IE 5.5–7, Firefox 2.0.0.4, Opera 9.21, Safari 3.0.2 beta for Windows, and Swift 0.2.

Finally, note that the XRE object from v0.1 has been removed. XRegExp now only creates one global variable: XRegExp. To permanently override the native RegExp constructor/object, you can now run XRegExp.overrideNative();

Update: This version of XRegExp is outdated. See XRegExp.com for the latest, greatest version.

parseUri 1.2: Split URLs in JavaScript

I've just updated parseUri. If you haven't seen the older version, parseUri is a function which splits any well-formed URI into its parts, all of which are optional. Its combination of accuracy, flexibility, and brevity is unrivaled.

Highlights:

  • Comprehensively splits URIs, including splitting the query string into key/value pairs. (Enhanced)
  • Two parsing modes: loose and strict. (New)
  • Easy to use (returns an object, so you can do, e.g., parseUri(uri).anchor).
  • Offers convenient, pre-concatenated components (path = directory and file; authority = userInfo, host, and port; etc.)
  • Change the default names of URI parts without editing the function, by updating parseUri.options.key. (New)
  • Exceptionally lightweight (1 KB before minification or gzipping).
  • Released under the MIT License.

Details:

Older versions of this function used what's now called loose parsing mode (which is still the default in this version). Loose mode deviates slightly from the official generic URI spec (RFC 3986), but by doing so allows the function to split URIs in a way that most end users would expect intuitively. However, the finer details of loose mode preclude it from properly handling relative paths which do not start from root (e.g., "../file.html" or "dir/file.html"). On the other hand, strict mode attempts to split URIs according to RFC 3986. Specifically, in loose mode, directories don't need to end with a slash (e.g., the "dir" in "/dir?query" is treated as a directory rather than a file name), and the URI can start with an authority without being preceded by "//" (which means that the "yahoo.com" in "yahoo.com/search/" is treated as the host, rather than part of the directory path).

Since I've assumed that most developers will consistently want to use one mode or the other, the parsing mode is not specified as an argument when running parseUri, but rather as a property of the parseUri function itself. Simply run the following line of code to switch to strict mode:

parseUri.options.strictMode = true;

From that point forward, parseUri will work in strict mode (until you turn it back off).

The code:

// parseUri 1.2.2
// (c) Steven Levithan <stevenlevithan.com>
// MIT License

function parseUri (str) {
	var	o   = parseUri.options,
		m   = o.parser[o.strictMode ? "strict" : "loose"].exec(str),
		uri = {},
		i   = 14;

	while (i--) uri[o.key[i]] = m[i] || "";

	uri[o.q.name] = {};
	uri[o.key[12]].replace(o.q.parser, function ($0, $1, $2) {
		if ($1) uri[o.q.name][$1] = $2;
	});

	return uri;
};

parseUri.options = {
	strictMode: false,
	key: ["source","protocol","authority","userInfo","user","password","host","port","relative","path","directory","file","query","anchor"],
	q:   {
		name:   "queryKey",
		parser: /(?:^|&)([^&=]*)=?([^&]*)/g
	},
	parser: {
		strict: /^(?:([^:\/?#]+):)?(?:\/\/((?:(([^:@]*)(?::([^:@]*))?)?@)?([^:\/?#]*)(?::(\d*))?))?((((?:[^?#\/]*\/)*)([^?#]*))(?:\?([^#]*))?(?:#(.*))?)/,
		loose:  /^(?:(?![^:@]+:[^:@\/]*@)([^:\/?#.]+):)?(?:\/\/)?((?:(([^:@]*)(?::([^:@]*))?)?@)?([^:\/?#]*)(?::(\d*))?)(((\/(?:[^?#](?![^?#\/]*\.[^?#\/.]+(?:[?#]|$)))*\/?)?([^?#\/]*))(?:\?([^#]*))?(?:#(.*))?)/
	}
};

You can download it here.

parseUri has no dependencies, and has been tested in IE 5.5–7, Firefox 2.0.0.4, Opera 9.21, Safari 3.0.1 beta for Windows, and Swift 0.2.

JavaScript Date Format

Update: The documentation below has been updated for the new Date Format 1.2. Get it now!

Although JavaScript provides a bunch of methods for getting and setting parts of a date object, it lacks a simple way to format dates and times according to a user-specified mask. There are a few scripts out there which provide this functionality, but I've never seen one that worked well for me… Most are needlessly bulky or slow, tie in unrelated functionality, use complicated mask syntaxes that more or less require you to read the documentation every time you want to use them, or don't account for special cases like escaping mask characters within the generated string.

When choosing which special mask characters to use for my JavaScript date formatter, I looked at PHP's date function and ColdFusion's discrete dateFormat and timeFormat functions. PHP uses a crazy mix of letters (to me at least, since I'm not a PHP programmer) to represent various date entities, and while I'll probably never memorize the full list, it does offer the advantages that you can apply both date and time formatting with one function, and that none of the special characters overlap (unlike ColdFusion where m and mm mean different things depending on whether you're dealing with dates or times). On the other hand, ColdFusion uses very easy to remember special characters for masks.

With my date formatter, I've tried to take the best features from both, and add some sugar of my own. It did end up a lot like the ColdFusion implementation though, since I've primarily used CF's mask syntax.

Before getting into further details, here are some examples of how this script can be used:

var now = new Date();

now.format("m/dd/yy");
// Returns, e.g., 6/09/07

// Can also be used as a standalone function
dateFormat(now, "dddd, mmmm dS, yyyy, h:MM:ss TT");
// Saturday, June 9th, 2007, 5:46:21 PM

// You can use one of several named masks
now.format("isoDateTime");
// 2007-06-09T17:46:21

// ...Or add your own
dateFormat.masks.hammerTime = 'HH:MM! "Can\'t touch this!"';
now.format("hammerTime");
// 17:46! Can't touch this!

// When using the standalone dateFormat function,
// you can also provide the date as a string
dateFormat("Jun 9 2007", "fullDate");
// Saturday, June 9, 2007

// Note that if you don't include the mask argument,
// dateFormat.masks.default is used
now.format();
// Sat Jun 09 2007 17:46:21

// And if you don't include the date argument,
// the current date and time is used
dateFormat();
// Sat Jun 09 2007 17:46:22

// You can also skip the date argument (as long as your mask doesn't
// contain any numbers), in which case the current date/time is used
dateFormat("longTime");
// 5:46:22 PM EST

// And finally, you can convert local time to UTC time. Either pass in
// true as an additional argument (no argument skipping allowed in this case):
dateFormat(now, "longTime", true);
now.format("longTime", true);
// Both lines return, e.g., 10:46:21 PM UTC

// ...Or add the prefix "UTC:" to your mask.
now.format("UTC:h:MM:ss TT Z");
// 10:46:21 PM UTC

Following are the special characters supported. Any differences in meaning from ColdFusion's dateFormat and timeFormat functions are noted.

Mask Description
d Day of the month as digits; no leading zero for single-digit days.
dd Day of the month as digits; leading zero for single-digit days.
ddd Day of the week as a three-letter abbreviation.
dddd Day of the week as its full name.
m Month as digits; no leading zero for single-digit months.
mm Month as digits; leading zero for single-digit months.
mmm Month as a three-letter abbreviation.
mmmm Month as its full name.
yy Year as last two digits; leading zero for years less than 10.
yyyy Year represented by four digits.
h Hours; no leading zero for single-digit hours (12-hour clock).
hh Hours; leading zero for single-digit hours (12-hour clock).
H Hours; no leading zero for single-digit hours (24-hour clock).
HH Hours; leading zero for single-digit hours (24-hour clock).
M Minutes; no leading zero for single-digit minutes.
Uppercase M unlike CF timeFormat's m to avoid conflict with months.
MM Minutes; leading zero for single-digit minutes.
Uppercase MM unlike CF timeFormat's mm to avoid conflict with months.
s Seconds; no leading zero for single-digit seconds.
ss Seconds; leading zero for single-digit seconds.
l or L Milliseconds. l gives 3 digits. L gives 2 digits.
t Lowercase, single-character time marker string: a or p.
No equivalent in CF.
tt Lowercase, two-character time marker string: am or pm.
No equivalent in CF.
T Uppercase, single-character time marker string: A or P.
Uppercase T unlike CF's t to allow for user-specified casing.
TT Uppercase, two-character time marker string: AM or PM.
Uppercase TT unlike CF's tt to allow for user-specified casing.
Z US timezone abbreviation, e.g. EST or MDT. With non-US timezones or in the Opera browser, the GMT/UTC offset is returned, e.g. GMT-0500
No equivalent in CF.
o GMT/UTC timezone offset, e.g. -0500 or +0230.
No equivalent in CF.
S The date's ordinal suffix (st, nd, rd, or th). Works well with d.
No equivalent in CF.
'…' or "…" Literal character sequence. Surrounding quotes are removed.
No equivalent in CF.
UTC: Must be the first four characters of the mask. Converts the date from local time to UTC/GMT/Zulu time before applying the mask. The "UTC:" prefix is removed.
No equivalent in CF.

And here are the named masks provided by default (you can easily change these or add your own):

Name Mask Example
default ddd mmm dd yyyy HH:MM:ss Sat Jun 09 2007 17:46:21
shortDate m/d/yy 6/9/07
mediumDate mmm d, yyyy Jun 9, 2007
longDate mmmm d, yyyy June 9, 2007
fullDate dddd, mmmm d, yyyy Saturday, June 9, 2007
shortTime h:MM TT 5:46 PM
mediumTime h:MM:ss TT 5:46:21 PM
longTime h:MM:ss TT Z 5:46:21 PM EST
isoDate yyyy-mm-dd 2007-06-09
isoTime HH:MM:ss 17:46:21
isoDateTime yyyy-mm-dd'T'HH:MM:ss 2007-06-09T17:46:21
isoUtcDateTime UTC:yyyy-mm-dd'T'HH:MM:ss'Z' 2007-06-09T22:46:21Z

A couple issues:

  • In the unlikely event that there is ambiguity in the meaning of your mask (e.g., m followed by mm, with no separating characters), put a pair of empty quotes between your metasequences. The quotes will be removed automatically.
  • If you need to include literal quotes in your mask, the following rules apply:
    • Unpaired quotes do not need special handling.
    • To include literal quotes inside masks which contain any other quote marks of the same type, you need to enclose them with the alternative quote type (i.e., double quotes for single quotes, and vice versa). E.g., date.format('h "o\'clock, y\'all!"') returns "6 o'clock, y'all". This can get a little hairy, perhaps, but I doubt people will really run into it that often. The previous example can also be written as date.format("h") + "o'clock, y'all!".

Here's the code:

/*
 * Date Format 1.2.3
 * (c) 2007-2009 Steven Levithan <stevenlevithan.com>
 * MIT license
 *
 * Includes enhancements by Scott Trenda <scott.trenda.net>
 * and Kris Kowal <cixar.com/~kris.kowal/>
 *
 * Accepts a date, a mask, or a date and a mask.
 * Returns a formatted version of the given date.
 * The date defaults to the current date/time.
 * The mask defaults to dateFormat.masks.default.
 */

var dateFormat = function () {
	var	token = /d{1,4}|m{1,4}|yy(?:yy)?|([HhMsTt])\1?|[LloSZ]|"[^"]*"|'[^']*'/g,
		timezone = /\b(?:[PMCEA][SDP]T|(?:Pacific|Mountain|Central|Eastern|Atlantic) (?:Standard|Daylight|Prevailing) Time|(?:GMT|UTC)(?:[-+]\d{4})?)\b/g,
		timezoneClip = /[^-+\dA-Z]/g,
		pad = function (val, len) {
			val = String(val);
			len = len || 2;
			while (val.length < len) val = "0" + val;
			return val;
		};

	// Regexes and supporting functions are cached through closure
	return function (date, mask, utc) {
		var dF = dateFormat;

		// You can't provide utc if you skip other args (use the "UTC:" mask prefix)
		if (arguments.length == 1 && Object.prototype.toString.call(date) == "[object String]" && !/\d/.test(date)) {
			mask = date;
			date = undefined;
		}

		// Passing date through Date applies Date.parse, if necessary
		date = date ? new Date(date) : new Date;
		if (isNaN(date)) throw SyntaxError("invalid date");

		mask = String(dF.masks[mask] || mask || dF.masks["default"]);

		// Allow setting the utc argument via the mask
		if (mask.slice(0, 4) == "UTC:") {
			mask = mask.slice(4);
			utc = true;
		}

		var	_ = utc ? "getUTC" : "get",
			d = date[_ + "Date"](),
			D = date[_ + "Day"](),
			m = date[_ + "Month"](),
			y = date[_ + "FullYear"](),
			H = date[_ + "Hours"](),
			M = date[_ + "Minutes"](),
			s = date[_ + "Seconds"](),
			L = date[_ + "Milliseconds"](),
			o = utc ? 0 : date.getTimezoneOffset(),
			flags = {
				d:    d,
				dd:   pad(d),
				ddd:  dF.i18n.dayNames[D],
				dddd: dF.i18n.dayNames[D + 7],
				m:    m + 1,
				mm:   pad(m + 1),
				mmm:  dF.i18n.monthNames[m],
				mmmm: dF.i18n.monthNames[m + 12],
				yy:   String(y).slice(2),
				yyyy: y,
				h:    H % 12 || 12,
				hh:   pad(H % 12 || 12),
				H:    H,
				HH:   pad(H),
				M:    M,
				MM:   pad(M),
				s:    s,
				ss:   pad(s),
				l:    pad(L, 3),
				L:    pad(L > 99 ? Math.round(L / 10) : L),
				t:    H < 12 ? "a"  : "p",
				tt:   H < 12 ? "am" : "pm",
				T:    H < 12 ? "A"  : "P",
				TT:   H < 12 ? "AM" : "PM",
				Z:    utc ? "UTC" : (String(date).match(timezone) || [""]).pop().replace(timezoneClip, ""),
				o:    (o > 0 ? "-" : "+") + pad(Math.floor(Math.abs(o) / 60) * 100 + Math.abs(o) % 60, 4),
				S:    ["th", "st", "nd", "rd"][d % 10 > 3 ? 0 : (d % 100 - d % 10 != 10) * d % 10]
			};

		return mask.replace(token, function ($0) {
			return $0 in flags ? flags[$0] : $0.slice(1, $0.length - 1);
		});
	};
}();

// Some common format strings
dateFormat.masks = {
	"default":      "ddd mmm dd yyyy HH:MM:ss",
	shortDate:      "m/d/yy",
	mediumDate:     "mmm d, yyyy",
	longDate:       "mmmm d, yyyy",
	fullDate:       "dddd, mmmm d, yyyy",
	shortTime:      "h:MM TT",
	mediumTime:     "h:MM:ss TT",
	longTime:       "h:MM:ss TT Z",
	isoDate:        "yyyy-mm-dd",
	isoTime:        "HH:MM:ss",
	isoDateTime:    "yyyy-mm-dd'T'HH:MM:ss",
	isoUtcDateTime: "UTC:yyyy-mm-dd'T'HH:MM:ss'Z'"
};

// Internationalization strings
dateFormat.i18n = {
	dayNames: [
		"Sun", "Mon", "Tue", "Wed", "Thu", "Fri", "Sat",
		"Sunday", "Monday", "Tuesday", "Wednesday", "Thursday", "Friday", "Saturday"
	],
	monthNames: [
		"Jan", "Feb", "Mar", "Apr", "May", "Jun", "Jul", "Aug", "Sep", "Oct", "Nov", "Dec",
		"January", "February", "March", "April", "May", "June", "July", "August", "September", "October", "November", "December"
	]
};

// For convenience...
Date.prototype.format = function (mask, utc) {
	return dateFormat(this, mask, utc);
};

Download it here (1.2 KB when minified and gzipped).

Note that the day and month names can be changed (for internationalization or other purposes) by updating the dateFormat.i18n object.

If you have any suggestions or find any issues, lemme know.


My new blog: Want to learn about aphantasisa and hyperphantasia, the Shen Yun cult, or establishing South Dakota residency to take advantage of nomad friendly laws? All of these and more await at Life After Tech.